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April 20, 2010

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Yvonne DiVita

Interesting, Bruce. Are we to assume then that a company which realizes its faults should just ignore them? Are we to believe the U.S.'s Fortune 500 companies operate the way you describe? Are we to believe that CEOs will/are/have the character to meet and greet all employees? Or that employees should concern themselves with the CEO because, after all, he or she is the reason the company exists?

I think you miss the point. I think you have great insight - a bonus in a world where relationships are of prime importance in business. But, I also think the show makes a point that says employees are not just numbers on a chart, and CEOs cannot know them -without getting out to meet them. And most big companies, like the ones on Undercover Boss, provide little opportunity for the employees and the CEO to interact.

The show gives all of us a reason to be better than we are. Because, in the end, we are not all we can be. "Great companies foster great employees that do great things regardless of who's looking"... I would agree with that but few big companies are great enough, today, to do that.

Maybe Undercover Boss will inspire them. And maybe it will be a lesson to new companies on the verge of greatness, today.

Bruce Peters

Not hooked at all on "Undercover Boss" for it conveys a couple of messages of what is wrong with how businesses might be lead. Two questions stand out.
The first is why don't the employees know who the boss is. Shame on them and the boss. Isn't it incumbent upon the leader to be at least visible to those that follow. Indeed, isn't it part of the leader's role? And, shouldn't the employee have some responsibility to know? I did a mini personal study a few years ago of asking Rental Car Employees the name of their company CEO. None knew. Yes, that is "none".
Secondly, if the leader needs to go into hiding ("Undercover") to learn what is going on in their organization what does that tell you about the company character and trust? It seems that great companies foster great employees that do great things regardless of who's looking.
For my part I will not watch the show and hope it has a limited shelf life. Nor will I do business with a company that feels the need. Wouldn't you rather do business with a company where the leader is well known and visible to employees ( Yes and clients) and where the character of the company is built on trust to do things right?

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