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This is for the Dads

Starshine by Yvonne DiVita

It's awhile until Father's Day but I think Dad's deserve a tribute every day, not just some random weekend in June.

Bill Cosby makes us laugh with his description of Father's Day and the obligatory "tie". That's how it was when I was a kid. You got your dad something...business-y. Or, if you were older and earned your own money, you might spring for concert tickets, or something for the car. Of course, everyone created the mug, ashtray, or T-shirt that said, "World's Best Dad." But, no one believed it. World's Best wasn't what we thought when we thought of our Dad.

It's hard to qualify "world's best," don't you think? And, it's such a cliche', our Dads don't believe it - do you?

Dads are every bit as important to children as Moms are. Dads are unique - within each family; there are dads that hang out in the garage and can fix the family car better than the mechanic down the street. There are dads that wear a suit to work each day and are very serious about earning that paycheck - so much so, they might bring work home more often than the kids (and Mom) would like. There are dads that believe the best things in their life are at home - and they bring home enough salary to take care of things, but they don't bring 'work' home with them.

There are dads that will let their daughters put make-up on them and fix their hair. Then, allow the child to take pictures! (this blog about and for dads is fantastic - especially this post about embarrassing your kids!) DAD

There are dads that love sports and work with their kids, girls or boys, to make sure they have all the equipment they need, and even a bit of coaching. They do it because they know it helps teach old-fashioned values like fair play, winning, helping others, and having fun. If they get caught up in the game and a bit overzealous, they make up for it later on, at the pizza parlor.

Then there are dads that aren't sure how to be dads. They mean well - but they don't get 'girls' and they don't like pets and they don't display affection, much. They love their kids as much as anyone else, but... kids are foreign territory to them. By the time the kids grow up and are able to relate to them one-on-one, it's too late. The kids have drifted off.

In the end, Dads are human. Dads deserve our love and respect. And, if they fall short of our expectations, we should cut them some slack.

After all, what goes around, comes around.

When your Dad becomes a Granddad, you'll see the light. And, so will he. (check out the links in this post - pretty interesting sites focused on Dads.)

Comments

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Kate Lifecell Reviews

It is always soooo tough to find a gift for my Dad. He is 81, has little vision, hard of hearing and has no hobbies. Every year I struggle to come up with something. Yikes! Loved you post.

Lifecell

Caren Gittleman

this post resonated with me more than you could possibly imagine.

My Dad was my entire world. (He passed in 2001). He was ALWAYS my world.

When I was 5 I used to wait at the end of the driveway for his car when he came home from work. I would run behind his car clapping, EVERY DAY, rain or shine.

One day we will talk but I never had the proper nurturing from my mother that most kids have. She never wanted any of us and made that clear on a daily basis.

It was my Dad I cried for when I was ill or had a bad dream.

It was my Dad who escorted me to all of my new schools when we moved.

My biggest thrill was when my Dad would bring home grease pencils and newsprint from the paper for me to draw with (we both shared artistic talent). He would draw me Mickey Mouse (my fave) on a daily basis. I was about 5. I remember being appalled when I would go to a friend's home and I would ask their Dad to draw me Mickey Mouse and they couldn't. My 5 yr old mind was saying "what's up with that???!!!"

My Dad had an amazing and wicked sense of humor. I loved when I would make him laugh.

He taught me to fish, taught me about sports and gave me a lifelong gift of appreciating men and being able to relate to them with ease due to genuinely LIKING men!

I will shut up now because the comment field isn't meant for a dissertation but I wanted to THANK YOU for touching my heart with this wonderful post. You enabled me to have a visit with my Dad's spirit. THANK YOU!

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