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June 10, 2014

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Yvonne DiVita

@Kimberly, it's comical that anyone would complain about a blog post with mention of their product. The goal is to demonstrate the product in its 'native' environment, namely, the dog's home! Oh well. Some folks just don't get it.

@Susan, love that you said 'combination of art and science' because that's so true! I believe the art of storytelling is so important in the day to day world of everything we do, and the science is how you improve on the art. Well said!

Susan C. Willett

Stories engage, plain and simple. And once readers are engaged, you can offer them your message. Storytelling is one of those skills that is a combination of art and science, and when done well, is a beautiful thing. Great post!

Kimberly Gauthier

I recently had a brand tell me that they were disappointed in my review of their product, because I wrote too much about my dogs and the commenting were only talking about their dogs.

What the person missed was that I had included his product in our lives. People don't read my blog to read about his product - they can go to his site for that. They come to my blog to see how the product would work in a dog family.

My writing process is simple. The first draft is raw, me getting all my ideas out. Then I go and edit - removing what doesn't need to be there. I keep my readers in mind. They follow me, because they want to see how Rodrigo, Sydney, Scout and Zoey are doing. They want to learn something I learned. They want to feel like they're not alone in figuring out how to raise happy, healthy dogs.

So my personal rants have taken a back seat and have been replaced with insightful explanations of why I support or don't support something. If I must write a 1000+ word post, it's broken up A LOT with headers, "tweet this" blurbs, and images. And I've learned that themes are fantastic.

I'm sharing the story of my life with dogs. I can easily incorporate brands, causes, and more in that story. But it always has to be my story, because that's the one my readers have come to expect.

Plus it's so damn fun!

Yvonne DiVita

@Robbi, I think you made an important point - that facts can be part of your story, but to make them the only story doesn't work!

@Carol, thanks for the compliment! You tell great stories on your blog. I'm always eager to read more at Fidose of Reality.

Robbi

That is the reason romance novels resonate -- conflict, seemingly insurmountable odds, the h/h change and grow and then happily ever after. I try to do that with my blog posts... tell a story so the reader gets drawn in. No one really wants to read a "just the facts ma'am" post, they want to feel a connection even IF you have to give some clear cut facts it can still be wrapped into a well-crafted story.

Carol Bryant

Blogging is storytelling at its finest, if done properly. I love reading posts where I wonder what is next, the reveal is not all at once, and yet I appreciate the author slowing me down in a fast-paced world. I believe you are a damned fine storyteller, Yvonne. I always find myself engrossed in your prose.

Yvonne DiVita

Amy, you hit the nail on the head, as they say. "Stories that resonate have conflict and emotion followed by resolution."

Pawsome!

Amy Shojai, CABC

Some of my first published pet work were personal experience stories (from my vet tech work) that "framed" the nonfiction articles. Putting a furry face on a topic...a real live cat named Sugar who had diabetes...with the struggles, near death and then cure, puts the issue in context and allows readers to become vested in the story and cheer that poster-kitty, for example. Open by introducing the "problem" (and the pet, in this instance), transition to the nuts and bolts of info you wish to share, and then close with the "problem solution" for that poster pet. (hence...bookends). Stories that resonate have conflict and emotion followed by resolution.

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